IV therapy to help fight coronary artery disease?

A therapy for eliminating toxic metals from the body is becoming increasingly popular as a tool to fight heart disease. In the US, the FDA has approved chelation (pronounced ‘key-LAY-shun’) therapy for treating lead poisoning and toxicity from other heavy metals, but it’s estimated that more than 100,000 adults receive the therapy each year as a form of complementary medicine.

Spurred on by the increased use of chelation therapy for treating heart disease, plus positive reports and small-scale case studies, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the US National Institutes of Health, decided to conduct a lengthy clinical trial to research the phenomenon on a large scale. The aim was to test the safety and effect of the disodium EDTA chelation agent in patients with cardiovascular disease. The positive results of the study, particularly among diabetic patients (where death rates were 43% lower in patients receiving chelation), led the NHLBI to fund a second long-term research project, which began in 2016. Read more


Menopause and the increased risk of heart disease

Coronary heart disease (CHD), the number one killer worldwide, is commonly regarded as something that afflicts men rather than women. But it would be a mistake to assume, as a woman, that you are not susceptible to CHD, especially if you are about to enter, or already going through, the menopause.

CHD may occur later in women than in men on average but it remains the biggest killer of women worldwide. As with any disease, awareness of your own susceptibility is your first layer of protection.

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Sudden heart attacks: Should the aging fitness buff be concerned?

Thinking about trying Ironman this year? Maybe a half-marathon to start? Or perhaps you’re just going to join a gym for the first time in a while.

Whether you turned twenty-one last week or you’re starting to think about retirement, us doctors simply love to prescribe fitness. Along with quitting smoking, sleeping more, and eating a healthy diet, it’s the lifestyle change we attach to many treatments. And with good reason – the power of fitness is undeniable.

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Does sugar lead to heart disease
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Does sugar lead to heart disease?

As a general rule, if something is bad for our health, we are told about it. In 1964, for example, the American Surgeon General published a report confirming the link between smoking and lung cancer – since then the tobacco industry itself has been obliged to warn customers of the harmful effects of its products. While smoking remains the leading cause of cancer, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), there isn’t a smoker on earth who can claim they haven’t been warned.

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Heart failure in the young – a growing health concern

February is traditionally the month for love – that is, for expressing your love to your partner on Valentine’s Day. But there is also another heart-shaped theme taking place in February in countries around the world that aims to remind us of just how important our cardiovascular health is.

That’s right, it’s Heart Month. An idea instigated in response to the stark fact that cardiovascular disease (CVD), more commonly known as heart disease, is the world’s number one killer. Read more